Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Your Ultimate Guide to 2015 Fall Hairstyles and Color!

Fabulous Fall Hair: What's Hot for 2015 ... and Hair Color You Will Dye For


We've researched the beauty mags, talked to the experts, and reviewed the fashion shows ... and now Salon 1580 has compiled a comprehensive guide for what is trending for fall 2015 in your quest for the best autumn hair!


“No-fuss” and “an effortless look” describe what’s trending for fall hair styles. 


Bohemian, loose waves for long hair -- hot during the spring and summer -- is a look carried over this year into autumn. The focus is on thick texture and movement. 

Here are some options to achieve tousled locks if you don't have natural waves: 
  1. Braid damp hair, air-dry, and unwind to achieve the bohemian/bedhead look. 
  2. Try getting a body wave from Salon 1580. 
  3. Spray long, damp hair with volumizer and blow-dry your hair upside down. Once your hair is 75 percent dry, part it and twist it into two low pigtail buns, leaving the ends out so they stay straight. Aim the blow-dryer at the buns for several minutes until they're dry, mist them with hair spray, undo the pins, and shake your hair out in all its rumpled glory.


Finger-raked knots, loose french twists, the undone updo, and the deconstructed chignon are hot styles for longer hair. Embrace messiness and ease with a new take on the classic french twist. Top knots are big.Try a twist secured with a statement piece pin and/or band, as shown below in Harper's Bazaar.


        
    


    


"Healthy hair" is the statement heard time and again in fashion circles. GKhair keratin hair-taming treatments can restore your unhealthy, lifeless hair, and it lasts from 3-5 months, depending on the formula type you choose. Salon 1580 is a featured GKhair salon!

Texturizing cuts are on the scene -- long layers, razored ends, darling pixie cuts, full fringe, and asymmetric, blunt cut bobs are seen this fall. Adding long layers throughout straight hair gives the illusion of volume and body. Layered shags are back (think '70s rocker). Fringe with rounded bangs are another throwback to the '70s.

   






Hair Color You Will Dye For This Fall:
Cocoa Cinnamon

#1 Cocoa Cinnamon -- chocolate brown overall with cinnamon highlights.
#2 Bronde -- a serious contender for the most-talked-about hue of summer is also primed to be huge for fall. This low-maintenance shade is a soft blend of blonde and brunette. 
#3 Pumpkin Spice -- slightly more copper and golden than red, but certainly not strawberry-blonde, pumpkin spice hair is a deep orange streaked with hues of caramel.
More hues for autumn hair: 
-- “Creamy Yellow,” “Honey Blonde,” "Flaxen Gold," and “Buttery Blonde” -- pale, golden tones and/or honey tones added to blonde hair

-- Light brown with blonde contrasting highlights
-- Blonde hair with rich brown and/or auburn lowlights
-- “Champagne Red” and “Strawberry Gold,” a great enhancement for dark blondes
-- "Burnt Auburn," “Cinnamon,” or “Copper” strands are perfect for fall.
-- “Medium Chocolate" or "Chestnut" with "Caramel Highlights” are just yummy!


Champagne Red
Burnt Auburn
Bronde













Ombrés are still big -- natural-looking, soft ombre highlights. Ask your stylist to give you highlights that are just barely lighter than your natural hue, working them into the ends and in random sections throughout, rather than perfectly spaced ones. 




Hair accessories are making a serious comeback, particularly headbands. Leather hair accessories like headbands and rawhide to tie back ponies are seen on the runway. Jeweled, decorative accents add glitz and glamour. 


 

 


Get your "neigh" on and sport a ponytail -- messy or sleek, bouncy volumized tails, low ponytails, tails wrapped in metal and leather are making a statement. Side-pinned low tails tucked just behind the ear, are huge for autumn. 


 


Deep side parts are big -- you will see them everywhere! A real eye-opener, too.


 


The two-toned look is trending, particularly with gel-slicked deep side parts. Try slicking a section from ear to ear for a headband look. If you use gel to go with the wet grunge look, be careful that it doesn't end up looking like greasy, unwashed hair.


 


There you have it -- what's trending for Autumn 2015! Call Pat Alessi - Salon 1580 today to schedule an appointment for great color and style!



Wednesday, September 2, 2015

HENNA - Beware! Why you can’t have chemical processing after henna treatments

Henna:  The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly – and why you can’t have chemical processing after henna treatments


Henna is a natural alternative to the traditional synthetic dyes used in hair salons. Pure, organic henna, (green henna) is derived from ground-up leaves of a plant. When mixed and applied properly, it creates a long-lasting, permanent red dye without the damaging effects and allergic reactions of traditional coloring products. 

Sounds great, right? Sure … unless you want to change your overall hair color, get highlights or lowlights, get a perm, or a keratin smoothing treatment.  Nope, can't do that if you have henna on your hair.

Bottom Line: Henna creates a coating on the hair shaft which prevents chemical treatments from properly penetrating the shaft. Therefore
  • Henna is not compatible with any type of oxidative color, whether it be permanent, demi-permanent, or lightener/ bleach. You cannot put color over henna (read more below).
  • Hair treated with henna cannot successfully be permed (permanently waved) as the absorption time of the perming lotion is increased to such a degree that chemical damage of the hair will be caused way before any permanent curls can be produced.
  • Hair-smoothing keratin treatments on hair previously treated with henna or metallic dyes will dramatically lift or lighten your color, with the resulting color very unpredictable. And the keratin may not be able to penetrate the shaft properly, so it can be a waste of your time and money. 

It is possible for your salon professional to try to strip the henna from the hair using alcohol and mineral oil, followed by a deep conditioning treatment, but it is time-consuming and expensive. It is strongly recommended to let your hair grow out from a henna treatment before returning back to conventional coloring products, perming or relaxing the hair.


Here’s the skinny on the good, the bad, and the ugly of henna hair treatments:


The Good:
Some Pros of Pure, Organic Henna
  • Covers grey hair very effectively
  • Provides permanent color
  • Strengthens, smooths, and seals the cuticle
  • Makes hair more resistant to breakage.
  • Healthy for the hair

HOWEVER ... If this is a route you you are deciding to go ... you need to read on!


The Bad (Limitations):
Henna is permanent, penetrating and sealing the hair shaft. Henna coats the hair on the outside only, glossing over the cuticles. Synthetic color, as well as perms, relaxers, and keratin treatments, reshape the cortex inside. So, if you henna first, you are applying this varnish on the cuticles. Then, when synthetically processing the hair through a salon chemical process, those cuticles are lifted, pushing the henna inside and chemically changing it, which can make for a very unpredictable and possibly unwanted outcome. This makes it very difficult, if not impossible, to color over in a uniform fashion with conventional salon color. Chemical treatments – salon color (including highlights), perming, or keratin treatments – cannot be applied until the henna is completely out of the hair. As we said earlier, it is possible to strip the henna from the hair but it is time-consuming and expensive. It is strongly recommended to let your hair grow out before returning back to conventional coloring products, perming or relaxing the hair.


The Ugly (Compound Henna):

Most commercial applications of henna (found in stores) are not pure henna, and are mixed with other dyes and/or chemical salts and other additives which can damage your hair and often reacts badly with the ammonia in synthetic hair dyes which salons use. Unfortunately, many pre-mixed henna powders do NOT have these ingredients listed. Buyer/user beware!